......................................................................................................................................................................................................................
William McKinley Monument (with Artists Rendition of Barrier Fence)

William McKinley Monument (with Artists Rendition of Barrier Fence)

acrylic on paper, 22x30" 2014

The William McKinley Monument welcomes you at the mouth of the Panhandle and is the one of the most visible and iconic San Francisco Public Artworks. It was created by Robert Ingersoll Aitken as a memorial to the President McKinley who had visited San Francisco 4months before his assassination.  As a side note, Theodor Roosevelt broke ground at the unveiling ceremony for the monument, and while in the area he accompanied John Muir on a trip to Yosemite, which resulted in the federal protection of land areas such as Yosemite. 

William McKinley Monument (with Artists Rendition of Barrier Fence)

William McKinley Monument (with Artists Rendition of Barrier Fence)

Installation View of Poster on Market Street, San Francisco, CA 2015

Le Poème de la Vigne (with Wine Grapes)

Le Poème de la Vigne (with Wine Grapes)

acrylic on canvas, 22 x 30" 2014

Le Poème de la Vigne is a bacchanalian allegory of the annual wine vintage by artist Gustave Doré who exhibited it at the 1878 Paris World’s Fair, and then in Chicago before it found it’s way to the 1894 California Mid-Winter International Exposition where later M.H de Young purchased the piece. Today it sits outside of the de Young Museum. Iconically this piece seemed central to the city’s identity as a fun loving and debaucherous place, and that sentiment is beautifully captured in the sculpture. 

Le Poème de la Vigne (with Wine Grapes)

Le Poème de la Vigne (with Wine Grapes)

Installation View of Poster on Market Street, San Francisco, CA 2015

Portals of the Past (with Original Home)

Portals of the Past (with Original Home)

acrylic on paper, 22x30" 2014

Portals of the Past is the most complex and layered memorial of the group and notably the only monument to commemorate the 1906 earthquake. During the earthquake, a fire destroyed the family home of South Pacific Railroads’ Vice President A. N. Towne, located in Nob Hill at 1101 California Street. The marble façade was all that remained of the building. This façade became widely known through an iconic photograph taken by Arnold Genthe, acclaimed San Francisco photographer. Caroline Towne donated the marble facade to the city park commission in 1909, and it was placed in its current location at Lloyd Lake where it still stands today. For this design, I superimposed the original house over the portal as a way to metaphorically reconnect the history of the object to the present. 

Portals of the Past (with Original Home)

Portals of the Past (with Original Home)

Installation View of Poster on Market Street, San Francisco, CA 2015

The John McLaren Monument (with Map of Golden Gate Park)

The John McLaren Monument (with Map of Golden Gate Park)

acrylic on paper, 22 x 30" 2014

The John McLaren Statue is a memorial to a man who didn’t want one. Mclaren created Golden Gate Park and dedicated his life to the advocacy and development of the 1,017-acre park—one of the largest in the world. It has been noted that he never liked statues in parks and attempted to hide them behind shrubbery. This includes his own statue, which was made against his wishes. The statue is positioned directly on the ground (without a pedestal) to signify McLaren’s connection to nature; in his lifetime, he planted two million trees. For this design, I have superimposed a map of Golden Gate Park over the image of his statue, which I have designed to be partially obscured by greenery.

The John McLaren Monument (with Map of Golden Gate Park)

The John McLaren Monument (with Map of Golden Gate Park)

Installation View of Poster on Market Street, San Francisco, CA 2015

 

Sarah B Cooper Memorial (with The Sarah B Cooper Elementary School)

Sarah B Cooper Memorial (with The Sarah B Cooper Elementary School)

acrylic on paper, 22 x 30" 2014

The Sarah B Cooper Memorial located near the Sharon Art Center, is currently in disrepair, but it is one of the few monuments to celebrate a woman from San Francisco’s history (reason alone to highlight this particular statue). Sarah Brown Ingersoll Cooper was a force for change in education and women’s rights in San Francisco and the first person to bring a kindergarten program to the American West. The image of a public school named in her honor—the school that is presently at 940 Filbert Street—is superimposed on the statue. Cooper had a harrowing life—her family fled the South from the civil war; her youngest daughter died at the age of 3 in 1863; her husband committed suicide in 1885; and in 1896, her daughter Harriet, after struggling with depression for years, committed suicide by turning the gas on in their home, killing both Sarah Cooper (her mother) and herself. Despite this tragic past, and numerous controversies, Cooper is remembered as a philanthropist, teacher, and women’s rights activist. For this design, I am worked with imagery of the elementary school named after Cooper, as well as her portrait. 

Sarah B Cooper Memorial (with The Sarah B Cooper Elementary School)

Sarah B Cooper Memorial (with The Sarah B Cooper Elementary School)

Installation View of Poster on Market Street, San Francisco, CA 2015

The Ball Thrower (with Candlestick Park)

The Ball Thrower (with Candlestick Park)

acrylic on canvas, 22 x 30'" 2014

The Ball Thrower was created by California Born Douglas Tilden some time around late the 1880’s in France and had been exhibited both in Paris and New York before it found its way to San Francisco. It found its home in the Park thanks in part to William E. Brown a friend of the sculptor and an influential local figure, who had appealed to the Parks board to have the work placed in Golden Gate Park. The original title for the piece was “The National Sport” which tells us about the rising popularity of baseball throughout the country at the time and the sports ability to encapsulate something essentially American. 

William McKinley Monument (with Artists Rendition of Barrier Fence)

acrylic on paper, 22x30" 2014

The William McKinley Monument welcomes you at the mouth of the Panhandle and is the one of the most visible and iconic San Francisco Public Artworks. It was created by Robert Ingersoll Aitken as a memorial to the President McKinley who had visited San Francisco 4months before his assassination.  As a side note, Theodor Roosevelt broke ground at the unveiling ceremony for the monument, and while in the area he accompanied John Muir on a trip to Yosemite, which resulted in the federal protection of land areas such as Yosemite. 

William McKinley Monument (with Artists Rendition of Barrier Fence)

Installation View of Poster on Market Street, San Francisco, CA 2015

Le Poème de la Vigne (with Wine Grapes)

acrylic on canvas, 22 x 30" 2014

Le Poème de la Vigne is a bacchanalian allegory of the annual wine vintage by artist Gustave Doré who exhibited it at the 1878 Paris World’s Fair, and then in Chicago before it found it’s way to the 1894 California Mid-Winter International Exposition where later M.H de Young purchased the piece. Today it sits outside of the de Young Museum. Iconically this piece seemed central to the city’s identity as a fun loving and debaucherous place, and that sentiment is beautifully captured in the sculpture. 

Le Poème de la Vigne (with Wine Grapes)

Installation View of Poster on Market Street, San Francisco, CA 2015

Portals of the Past (with Original Home)

acrylic on paper, 22x30" 2014

Portals of the Past is the most complex and layered memorial of the group and notably the only monument to commemorate the 1906 earthquake. During the earthquake, a fire destroyed the family home of South Pacific Railroads’ Vice President A. N. Towne, located in Nob Hill at 1101 California Street. The marble façade was all that remained of the building. This façade became widely known through an iconic photograph taken by Arnold Genthe, acclaimed San Francisco photographer. Caroline Towne donated the marble facade to the city park commission in 1909, and it was placed in its current location at Lloyd Lake where it still stands today. For this design, I superimposed the original house over the portal as a way to metaphorically reconnect the history of the object to the present. 

Portals of the Past (with Original Home)

Installation View of Poster on Market Street, San Francisco, CA 2015

The John McLaren Monument (with Map of Golden Gate Park)

acrylic on paper, 22 x 30" 2014

The John McLaren Statue is a memorial to a man who didn’t want one. Mclaren created Golden Gate Park and dedicated his life to the advocacy and development of the 1,017-acre park—one of the largest in the world. It has been noted that he never liked statues in parks and attempted to hide them behind shrubbery. This includes his own statue, which was made against his wishes. The statue is positioned directly on the ground (without a pedestal) to signify McLaren’s connection to nature; in his lifetime, he planted two million trees. For this design, I have superimposed a map of Golden Gate Park over the image of his statue, which I have designed to be partially obscured by greenery.

The John McLaren Monument (with Map of Golden Gate Park)

Installation View of Poster on Market Street, San Francisco, CA 2015

 

Sarah B Cooper Memorial (with The Sarah B Cooper Elementary School)

acrylic on paper, 22 x 30" 2014

The Sarah B Cooper Memorial located near the Sharon Art Center, is currently in disrepair, but it is one of the few monuments to celebrate a woman from San Francisco’s history (reason alone to highlight this particular statue). Sarah Brown Ingersoll Cooper was a force for change in education and women’s rights in San Francisco and the first person to bring a kindergarten program to the American West. The image of a public school named in her honor—the school that is presently at 940 Filbert Street—is superimposed on the statue. Cooper had a harrowing life—her family fled the South from the civil war; her youngest daughter died at the age of 3 in 1863; her husband committed suicide in 1885; and in 1896, her daughter Harriet, after struggling with depression for years, committed suicide by turning the gas on in their home, killing both Sarah Cooper (her mother) and herself. Despite this tragic past, and numerous controversies, Cooper is remembered as a philanthropist, teacher, and women’s rights activist. For this design, I am worked with imagery of the elementary school named after Cooper, as well as her portrait. 

Sarah B Cooper Memorial (with The Sarah B Cooper Elementary School)

Installation View of Poster on Market Street, San Francisco, CA 2015

The Ball Thrower (with Candlestick Park)

acrylic on canvas, 22 x 30'" 2014

The Ball Thrower was created by California Born Douglas Tilden some time around late the 1880’s in France and had been exhibited both in Paris and New York before it found its way to San Francisco. It found its home in the Park thanks in part to William E. Brown a friend of the sculptor and an influential local figure, who had appealed to the Parks board to have the work placed in Golden Gate Park. The original title for the piece was “The National Sport” which tells us about the rising popularity of baseball throughout the country at the time and the sports ability to encapsulate something essentially American. 

William McKinley Monument (with Artists Rendition of Barrier Fence)
William McKinley Monument (with Artists Rendition of Barrier Fence)
Le Poème de la Vigne (with Wine Grapes)
Le Poème de la Vigne (with Wine Grapes)
Portals of the Past (with Original Home)
Portals of the Past (with Original Home)
The John McLaren Monument (with Map of Golden Gate Park)
The John McLaren Monument (with Map of Golden Gate Park)
Sarah B Cooper Memorial (with The Sarah B Cooper Elementary School)
Sarah B Cooper Memorial (with The Sarah B Cooper Elementary School)
The Ball Thrower (with Candlestick Park)